The Fear of Monkeys - The Best E-Zine on the Web for Politically Conscious WritingThe Black-mantled Tamarin - Issue Nineteen
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The Black-mantled Tamarin: photo from Christian ArtusoThe Black-mantled Tamarin is a species of tamarin from the northwestern Amazon in far western Brazil, southeastern Colombia and northeastern Peru where they mainly eats insects, leaves, and fruit. They are 1528 cm in length and their tail length is 2742 cm. Family groups consisting of a male, a female and 1 or 2 young live in a defined territory - the female marks branches on the boundaries of the territory with secretions of her anal glands and urine. The female gives birth to 2 young after a gestation of 140 to 150 days. They are listed as Least Concern due to its adaptability to disturbed habitats, presumed large populations, and occurrence in a number of protected areas. It is not believed to be declining at a rate sufficient to qualify for a threatened category. Although they were captured for export for biomedical research in the 60s and 70s, they are still common.

   


The Child Who Never Was

By

Roy Blokker

There is a church and school near-by
And on a corner of its grounds, for sensation,
Two hundred seven little crosses lie,
A visual protest and representation
Of abortions performed in our county each year,
A white badge in segments of our obligations,
And I think instead of the broad definition:
"Anything that fails to progress, develop, or mature."
Two hundred seven is about eleven minutes for the poor
Children killed worldwide by malnutrition.
But they don't count, apparently -
They are the children we never see,
Given neither chance nor choice to live through;
The Child Who Never Was sheds her tears for you.

 


Roy Blokker was born in Holland in 1950. His parents immigrated when he was two. Roy graduated from the University of California at Santa Cruz, cutting his teeth on social issues while reaching maturity (debatably, according to many) during the Sixties. He worked as a letter carrier for the US Postal Service for 31 years. Roy is now retired and devoting his energies to the art and the craft of writing. He has written The Music of Dmitri Shostakovich: The Symphonies (with Robert Dearling), the novel Amber Waves, and five collections of poetry, the latest of which is a tribute to the soldier-poets of World War One entitled Charles Sorley's Ghost. His work has appeared in The American Dissident, Clever, Black Heart, First Line, American Aesthetic, Leaves of Ink, and Highlights for Children, among others. Roy and his bride of forty years lives in Glacier country in Montana.

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